Strategies for Implementing Guided Math

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For your Common Core curriculum.

GRADES K-8
This resource delves into the strategies necessary to effectively implement the 7 elements of the Guided Math Framework, including whole-class instruction, small-group instruction, Math Workshop, and assessment. Sample lessons, activities, and classroom snapshots of strategy implementation are provided at 3 grade level spans: K-2, 3-5, and 6-8. Includes 3-ring binder and teacher resource CD-ROM that is compatible with both Windows174, and Macintosh174,. 304 pages.


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CCSS Product Alignment

Math Grade 6

6.RP.3a Make tables of equivalent ratios relating quantities with whole-number measurements, find missing values in the tables, and plot the pairs of values on the coordinate plane. Use tables to compare ratios.

6.RP.3c Find a percent of a quantity as a rate per 100 (e.g., 30%% of a quantity means 30/100 times the quantity), solve problems involving finding the whole, given a part and the percent.

6.NS.5 Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values (e.g., temperature above/below zero, elevation above/below sea level, credits/debits, positive/negative electric charge), use positive and negative numbers to represent quantities in real-world contexts, explaining the meaning of 0 in each situation.

6.EE.1 Write and evaluate numerical expressions involving whole-number exponents.

6.EE.2a Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters standing for numbers. For example, express the calculation Subtract y from 5 as 5 - y.

6.EE.6 Use variables to represent numbers and write expressions when solving a real-world or mathematical problem, understand that a variable can represent an unknown number, or, depending on the purpose at hand, any number in a specified set.

6.EE.7 Solve real-world and mathematical problems by writing and solving equations of the form x + p = q and px = q for cases in which p, q and x are all nonnegative rational numbers.

6.EE.9 Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another, write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable. Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation. For example, in a problem involving motion at constant speed, list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and write the equation d = 65t to represent the relationship between distance and time.

6.SP.3 Recognize that a measure of center for a numerical data set summarizes all of its values with a single number, while a measure of variation describes how its values vary with a single number.

6.SP.5c Giving quantitative measures of center (median and/or mean) and variability (interquartile range and/or mean absolute deviation), as well as describing any overall pattern and any striking deviations from the overall pattern with reference to the context in which the data were gathered.

Math Grade 7

7.RP.2c Represent proportional relationships by equations. For example, if total cost t is proportional to the number n of items purchased at a constant price p, the relationship between the total cost and the number of items can be expressed as t = pn.

7.RP.3 Use proportional relationships to solve multistep ratio and percent problems. Examples: simple interest, tax, markups and markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees, percent increase and decrease, percent error.

7.NS.1b Understand p + q as the number located a distance q from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.

7.NS.1c Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p - q = p + (-q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts.

7.NS.1d Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

7.NS.3 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers.

7.EE.3 Solve multi-step real-life and mathematical problems posed with positive and negative rational numbers in any form (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals), using tools strategically. Apply properties of operations to calculate with numbers in any form, convert between forms as appropriate, and assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies. For example: If a woman making $25 an hour gets a 10%% raise, she will make an additional 1/10 of her salary an hour, or $2.50, for a new salary of $27.50. If you want to place a towel bar 9 3/4 inches long in the center of a door that is 27 1/2 inches wide, you will need to place the bar about 9 inches from each edge, this estimate can be used as a check on the exact computation.

7.G.2 Draw (freehand, with ruler and protractor, and with technology) geometric shapes with given conditions. Focus on constructing triangles from three measures of angles or sides, noticing when the conditions determine a unique triangle, more than one triangle, or no triangle.

7.G.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems, give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

Math Grade 8

8.EE.1 Know and apply the properties of integer exponents to generate equivalent numerical expressions. For example, 32 x 3-5 = 3-3 = 1/33 = 1/27.

8.EE.5 Graph proportional relationships, interpreting the unit rate as the slope of the graph. Compare two different proportional relationships represented in different ways. For example, compare a distance-time graph to a distance-time equation to determine which of two moving objects has greater speed.

8.F.4 Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x, y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.

8.G.6 Explain a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse.

8.G.7 Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in real-world and mathematical problems in two and three dimensions.

Brand  :       Shell Education
Item Weight  :       3.50
Manufacturer Part Number  :       50531
 
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