Common Core Collaborative Cards - Number Systems

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Product Number: TB25820

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Grades 6-8.

For your Common Core curriculum.

Use these uniquely designed cards to reinforce the content from the Common Core State Standards. Students solve the problem on their own card, then students with the same answer form collaborative groups for further problem-solving activities. Cards can also be used individually or in small groups. Includes 120 - 434, x 634, cards (40 per grade level) and teacher's guide with complete instructions and suggestions for problem-solving lessons for the collaborative groups.

CCSS Product Alignment

Math Grade 6

6.NS.1 Interpret and compute quotients of fractions, and solve word problems involving division of fractions by fractions, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, create a story context for (2/3) / (3/4) and use a visual fraction model to show the quotient, use the relationship between multiplication and division to explain that (2/3) / (3/4) = 8/9 because 3/4 of 8/9 is 2/3. (In general, (a/b) / (c/d) = ad/bc.) How much chocolate will each person get if 3 people share 1/2 lb of chocolate equally? How many -cup servings are in 2/3 of a cup of yogurt? How wide is a rectangular strip of land with length 3/4 mi and area 1/2 square mi?.

6.NS.2 Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm.

6.NS.3 Fluently add, subtract, multiply, and divide multi-digit decimals using the standard algorithm for each operation.

6.NS.4 Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2).

6.NS.5 Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values (e.g., temperature above/below zero, elevation above/below sea level, credits/debits, positive/negative electric charge), use positive and negative numbers to represent quantities in real-world contexts, explaining the meaning of 0 in each situation.

6.NS.6a Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line, recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the number itself, e.g., -(-3) = 3, and that 0 is its own opposite.

6.NS.7a Interpret statements of inequality as statements about the relative position of two numbers on a number line diagram. For example, interpret -3 > -7 as a statement that -3 is located to the right of -7 on a number line oriented from left to right.

6.NS.8 Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate.

Math Grade 7

7.NS.1a Describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged.

7.NS.1b Understand p + q as the number located a distance q from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.

7.NS.1c Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p - q = p + (-q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts.

7.NS.1d Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

7.NS.2a Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.

7.NS.2b Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number. If p and q are integers, then -(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.

7.NS.2c Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers.

7.NS.2d Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division, know that the decimal form of a rational number terminates in 0s or eventually repeats.

7.NS.3 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers.

Math Grade 8

8.NS.1 Know that numbers that are not rational are called irrational. Understand informally that every number has a decimal expansion, for rational numbers show that the decimal expansion repeats eventually, and convert a decimal expansion which repeats eventually into a rational number.

8.NS.2 Use rational approximations of irrational numbers to compare the size of irrational numbers, locate them approximately on a number line diagram, and estimate the value of expressions (e.g., 960,). For example, by truncating the decimal expansion of 8730,2, show that 8730,2 is between 1 and 2, then between 1.4 and 1.5, and explain how to continue on to get better approximations.

8.F.1 Understand that a function is a rule that assigns to each input exactly one output. The graph of a function is the set of ordered pairs consisting of an input and the corresponding output.

8.F.2 Compare properties of two functions each represented in a different way (algebraically, graphically, numerically in tables, or by verbal descriptions). For example, given a linear function represented by a table of values and a linear function represented by an algebraic expression, determine which function has the greater rate of change.

8.F.3 Interpret the equation y = mx + b as defining a linear function, whose graph is a straight line, give examples of functions that are not linear. For example, the function A = s2 giving the area of a square as a function of its side length is not linear because its graph contains the points (1,1), (2,4) and (3,9), which are not on a straight line.

8.F.4 Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x, y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.

8.F.5 Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph (e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear). Sketch a graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been described verbally.

Item Weight: 1.75
Age: 11 yrs. - 13 yrs.
Grade: 6 - 8
School Type: Middle School
Subject Areas: Algebra, Pre-Algebra
Prop 65:
 

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