Algebra Puzzles

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Algebra Puzzles
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Product Number: TB22975

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Sorry, this product is no longer available. For your Common Core curriculum.

Not your typical algebra workbook, Algebra Puzzles uses games, puzzles, and other problem-solving activities to give students fresh, new ways of exploring learned concepts. While reviewing essential concepts and vocabulary for pre-algebra and algebra, the book helps students visualize and think more deeply about these abstract ideas. The perfect antidote to algebra anxiety. 80 pages. Grades 6-8.

CCSS Product Alignment

6.NS.4 Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2).

6.NS.6a Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line, recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the number itself, e.g., -(-3) = 3, and that 0 is its own opposite.

6.NS.6b Understand signs of numbers in ordered pairs as indicating locations in quadrants of the coordinate plane, recognize that when two ordered pairs differ only by signs, the locations of the points are related by reflections across one or both axes.

6.NS.6c Find and position integers and other rational numbers on a horizontal or vertical number line diagram, find and position pairs of integers and other rational numbers on a coordinate plane.

6.NS.7a Interpret statements of inequality as statements about the relative position of two numbers on a number line diagram. For example, interpret -3 > -7 as a statement that -3 is located to the right of -7 on a number line oriented from left to right.

6.NS.7b Write, interpret, and explain statements of order for rational numbers in real-world contexts. For example, write -3 °C > -7 °C to express the fact that -3 °C is warmer than -7 °C.

6.NS.7c Understand the absolute value of a rational number as its distance from 0 on the number line, interpret absolute value as magnitude for a positive or negative quantity in a real-world situation. For example, for an account balance of -30 dollars, write -30 = 30 to describe the size of the debt in dollars.

6.NS.7d Distinguish comparisons of absolute value from statements about order. For example, recognize that an account balance less than -30 dollars represents a debt greater than 30 dollars.

6.NS.8 Solve real-world and mathematical problems by graphing points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane. Include use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate.

6.EE.2a Write expressions that record operations with numbers and with letters standing for numbers. For example, express the calculation Subtract y from 5 as 5 - y.

6.EE.2b Identify parts of an expression using mathematical terms (sum, term, product, factor, quotient, coefficient), view one or more parts of an expression as a single entity. For example, describe the expression 2 (8 + 7) as a product of two factors, view (8 + 7) as both a single entity and a sum of two terms.

6.EE.2c Evaluate expressions at specific values of their variables. Include expressions that arise from formulas used in real-world problems. Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, in the conventional order when there are no parentheses to specify a particular order (Order of Operations). For example, use the formulas V = s and A = 6 s to find the volume and surface area of a cube with sides of length s = 1/2.

6.EE.3 Apply the properties of operations to generate equivalent expressions. For example, apply the distributive property to the expression 3 (2 + x) to produce the equivalent expression 6 + 3x, apply the distributive property to the expression 24x + 18y to produce the equivalent expression 6 (4x + 3y), apply properties of operations to y + y + y to produce the equivalent expression 3y.

6.EE.6 Use variables to represent numbers and write expressions when solving a real-world or mathematical problem, understand that a variable can represent an unknown number, or, depending on the purpose at hand, any number in a specified set.

6.EE.9 Use variables to represent two quantities in a real-world problem that change in relationship to one another, write an equation to express one quantity, thought of as the dependent variable, in terms of the other quantity, thought of as the independent variable. Analyze the relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation. For example, in a problem involving motion at constant speed, list and graph ordered pairs of distances and times, and write the equation d = 65t to represent the relationship between distance and time.

Math Grade 7

7.RP.2a Decide whether two quantities are in a proportional relationship, e.g., by testing for equivalent ratios in a table or graphing on a coordinate plane and observing whether the graph is a straight line through the origin.

7.RP.2b Identify the constant of proportionality (unit rate) in tables, graphs, equations, diagrams, and verbal descriptions of proportional relationships.

7.RP.2c Represent proportional relationships by equations. For example, if total cost t is proportional to the number n of items purchased at a constant price p, the relationship between the total cost and the number of items can be expressed as t = pn.

7.RP.2d Explain what a point (x, y) on the graph of a proportional relationship means in terms of the situation, with special attention to the points (0, 0) and (1, r) where r is the unit rate.

7.NS.1a Describe situations in which opposite quantities combine to make 0. For example, a hydrogen atom has 0 charge because its two constituents are oppositely charged.

7.NS.1b Understand p + q as the number located a distance q from p, in the positive or negative direction depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.

7.NS.1c Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p - q = p + (-q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts.

7.NS.1d Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract rational numbers.

7.NS.2a Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers. Interpret products of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.

7.NS.2b Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number. If p and q are integers, then -(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q). Interpret quotients of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.

7.NS.2c Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide rational numbers.

7.NS.2d Convert a rational number to a decimal using long division, know that the decimal form of a rational number terminates in 0s or eventually repeats.

7.NS.3 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving the four operations with rational numbers.

7.EE.3 Solve multi-step real-life and mathematical problems posed with positive and negative rational numbers in any form (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals), using tools strategically. Apply properties of operations to calculate with numbers in any form, convert between forms as appropriate, and assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies. For example: If a woman making $25 an hour gets a 10%% raise, she will make an additional 1/10 of her salary an hour, or $2.50, for a new salary of $27.50. If you want to place a towel bar 9 3/4 inches long in the center of a door that is 27 1/2 inches wide, you will need to place the bar about 9 inches from each edge, this estimate can be used as a check on the exact computation.

7.G.4 Know the formulas for the area and circumference of a circle and use them to solve problems, give an informal derivation of the relationship between the circumference and area of a circle.

Math Grade 8

8.F.4 Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities. Determine the rate of change and initial value of the function from a description of a relationship or from two (x, y) values, including reading these from a table or from a graph. Interpret the rate of change and initial value of a linear function in terms of the situation it models, and in terms of its graph or a table of values.

8.G.7 Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in real-world and mathematical problems in two and three dimensions.

Brand  :       Creative Teaching
Item Weight  :       0.56
Manufacturer Part Number  :       CTP2569
 
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